Key moments from the Olympic Games: Day 6

Michael Kappeler/picture alliance via Getty Images

(TOKYO) — Each day, ABC News will give you a roundup of key Olympic moments from the day’s events in Tokyo, happening 13 hours ahead of U.S. Eastern Standard Time. After a 12-month delay, the unprecedented 2020 Summer Olympics is taking place without fans or spectators and under a state of emergency due to the coronavirus pandemic.

Sunisa Lee wins gold

Sunisa Lee won the gold medal after a tremendous performance in the individual all-around competition. Lee’s teammate Simone Biles cheered her on from the stands as Lee delivered a strong floor exercise routine to seal the win.

Biles withdrew from the competition Wednesday so she could “focus on her mental health,” USA Gymnastics said in a statement Wednesday. Biles’ replacement in the competition, Jade Carey, finished in 8th place.

Caeleb Dressel wins gold in 100m freestyle, sets Olympic record

U.S. swimmer Caeleb Dressel won his first individual gold medal after a record-setting time of 47.02 seconds in the 100m freestyle. Fellow swimmer Robert Finke took home the gold in the 800m freestyle event, increasing Team USA’s gold medal count to 13.

COVID-19 cases at Tokyo Olympics rise to 198, Tokyo sees record number of cases

There were 24 newly confirmed cases of COVID-19 among people at the Tokyo Olympics on Thursday, including U.S. pole vaulter Sam Kendricks and two other athletes staying in the Olympic village. The total now stands at 198, according to data released by the Tokyo 2020 organizing committee.

The surrounding city of Tokyo reported a record high of 3,865 new cases on Wednesday, a seven-day average increase of 161.9%, according to data released by the Tokyo metropolitan government.

Heat continues to be a factor, tennis matches moved to later afternoon

The heat index hit 99 degrees on Wednesday, causing athletes, including the world’s second-ranked tennis player, Daniil Medvedev, to seek medical attention. The matches were moved from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. local time to avoid the hottest part of the day, the International Tennis Federation announced in a statement.

Djokovic 2 games away from Golden Slam

Serbia’s Novak Djokovic, the top ranked tennis player in the world, is two games away from achieving a Golden Slam after defeating Japan’s Kei Nishikori 6-2, 6-0. A player would have to win all four major events and the Olympics in a calendar year, a triumph only ever attained by Germany’s Steffi Graf.

For more Olympics coverage, see: https://abcnews.go.com/Sports/Olympics

Copyright © 2021, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.

Sunisa Lee wins gold in gymnastics all-around in Tokyo Olympics

Jamie Squire/Getty Images

(TOKYO) — Sunisa Lee has won gold in the gymnastics all-around at the Tokyo Olympics.

Americans have now won gold in the women’s gymnastics all-around for the last five Olympic Games, starting with Carly Patterson in 2004, Nastia Liukin in 2008, Gabby Douglas in 2012 and Simone Biles in 2016.

Lee went into the all-arounds with a medal already in her pocket, having been part of the U.S. team that won silver Tuesday.

An event initially thought to be a showcase for the all-time great, the all-around field was blown wide open with Simone Biles’ withdrawal.

Each nation is only allowed up to two athletes to compete in the individual gymnastics event. After the qualifying event this past weekend, Biles, who came in first, and Lee were set to be the Americans in the final. Biles’ withdrawal opened up a spot for Jade Carey.

Carey came in ninth in the qualifier overall — rankings that included Biles and a third Russian Olympic Committee gymnast ahead of her.

Lee, meanwhile, came in third behind Biles and Brazil’s Rebeca Andrade. The difference between Lee’s and Andrade’s scores was 0.23 points; the difference between Carey’s and Andrade’s scores was 1.13.

The Minnesota-based Lee went into the all-arounds with a medal already in her pocket, having been part of the U.S. team that won silver Tuesday.

The first Hmong American Olympian, Lee, 18, reached victory with a strong performance in her signature event, uneven bars, and a strong vault.

Rebeca Andrade of Brazil won silver, bringing home the first gymnastics medal for a Brazilian woman. Angelina Melnikova, a Russian athlete competing under the ROC, won bronze.

An event initially thought to be a showcase for the all-time great, the all-around field was blown wide open with Simone Biles’ withdrawal.

Each nation is only allowed up to two athletes to compete in the individual gymnastics event. After the qualifying event this past weekend, Biles, who came in first, and Lee were set to be the Americans in the final. Biles’ withdrawal opened up a spot for Jade Carey.

Carey ultimately finished the event in eighth place, with a powerful performance on her stronger apparatus, vault, but a fall on beam.

Carey came in ninth in the qualifier overall — rankings that included Biles and a third Russian Olympic Committee gymnast ahead of her.

Lee is a phenom on uneven bars, while Carey is strong on vault. In the qualifier, they both scored over 15 points on those respective apparatuses, accounting for two of the five above-15 scores on any apparatus from any athlete in that event.

After the individual all-around, Lee has qualified to compete in the uneven bars and balance beams event finals, and Carey has qualified for the vault and floor event finals. Carey qualified for the Olympics as an individual, not part of the team competition.

Biles had a misstep on vault at the start of the team competition and withdrew from the rest of competition. USA Gymnastics announced her withdrawal from the all-around event on Wednesday.

“After further medical evaluation, Simone Biles has withdrawn from the final individual all-around competition at the Tokyo Olympic Games, in order to focus on her mental health,” USAG said in a statement.

The organization added that Biles “will continue to be evaluated daily to determine whether or not to participate in next week’s individual event finals.”

She was in the stands with the rest of the Team USA gymnasts cheering Lee and Carey on Thursday.

For more Olympics coverage, click here.

Copyright © 2021, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.

Dutch skateboarder Candy Jacobs discusses nightmare of missing Olympics due to COVID

iStock/herraez

(TOKYO) — Candy Jacobs has spent the last eight days inside a tiny, spartan hotel room in Tokyo — unable to see friends, skate board or even breathe fresh air. It’s a far cry from the open-air Ariake Urban Sports Park where the Dutch street skater expected to spend her time during the Olympics.

The 31-year-old’s nightmare stay in Tokyo began with a simple spit test at Tokyo’s airport on July 21. Positive follow-up tests confirmed she would have to be taken immediately to quarantine — and miss the women’s street skateboarding event she had been training to compete in for years.

She tested positive despite the fact that she took PCR tests four days in a row — all negative — before leaving from the Netherlands and has been fully inoculated with the Pfizer vaccine.

“I was in a sports bubble [in the Netherlands], didn’t see anyone, then went to the airport, flew here, got here,” Jacobs told ABC News’ James Longman over Zoom from her quarantine room. “Did the spit test at the way to the airport [and waited] really long. And then they found out the spit tested positive.”

Jacobs has been told a man on her flight to Japan tested positive for COVID, the only explanation for her positive test. “We can never be sure 100%. But looking back, that’s probably the spot where it happened,” she said.

After days of pushing to get some fresh air, her embassy intervened and officials allowed her and six other quarantining guests to stand together in a room with an open window for 15 minutes. She said the whole experience has been horrific and depressing.

There are speakers in the rooms, which tell them when they have to take their temperature, blood oxygen level and when they must go down to collect their food.

“I’m trying to hang in there. You know, it’s actually been super tough,” Jacobs told ABC News. “There’s no space. There’s not even like a little. I found the emergency door has like a little gasp of air coming through it. And sometimes when I get to pick up my food, I’ll stand there for a minute.”

“It went from the Olympic dream to this real quick,” she added.

She has suffered from a loss of taste and smell, a common symptom of COVID, and some lethargy, but is otherwise fine, Jacobs said.

“I try to just be active and I try to do a kickflip every day in my room,” she said, adding the carpet is too thick for her skateboard to roll. “I try to work out as much as I can when my body is like feeling up for it. But I’m noticing the first two or three days I was super active, and then at one point — it’s also from lacking outside air — your body just is going on standby mode.”

Skateboarding was held for the first time in the Olympics in Tokyo. The women’s street competition, for which Jacobs was scheduled to compete, was held on Monday. The podium was dominated by a group of teenagers, with 13-year-olds Momiji Nishiya of Japan and Rayssa Leal of Brazil winning gold and silver, respectively. Funa Nakayama, 16, of Japan, rounded out the podium with bronze.

Jacobs is currently ranked No. 8 in the world and would have been a medal contender. She said she watched the competition alone in her hotel room. While she said she was happy to see the event, and root on her Dutch teammate Roos Zwetsloot — who finished fifth — the reality sank in once it was over.

“Even though this is the scenario you’re in, you still have a little bit of hope that someone made a mistake and someone’s going to go and be like, ‘OK, we figured something out,'” Jacobs said. “So when that drops away, it was like, ‘OK, so now it gets really tough,’ because this is a moment — it’s never going to be the first time skateboarding ever in the Olympics.”

“And every time someone’s going to talk about the Olympics, this is going to be what they think of when they see me,” she continued. “And they’re not going to think about how good of a skateboarder I am or that historic moment in time. You’re going to think, ‘Oh, yeah, that was the moment she tested positive for COVID.'”

There have been 174 positive COVID cases at the Olympics, as of Wednesday, though most positive tests have been by contractors and “games-concerned personnel.” Seventeen, including Jacobs, have been athletes. She was the eighth athlete to test positive.

Jacobs expects to be released from the quarantine on Friday. She said she will immediately depart the city, flying home to Europe.

She is already turning her attention to the next games.

“I’m going to prepare for Paris 2024, so I have a long way to go,” Jacobs said.

Copyright © 2021, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.

American Caeleb Dressel sets swim Olympic record in Tokyo

Xavier Laine/Getty Images

(TOKYO) — Caeleb Dressel set a new Olympic record in swimming at the 2020 Tokyo Olympics.

The Florida-based swimmer can count himself among the greats after the 100-meter freestyle on Wednesday, which he swam in 47.02.

Dressel was visibly emotional at the conclusion of the race, telling NBC in an interview immediately after getting out of the pool, “It’s a really tough year, just really hard, so to have the results show up, I mean, it really came together, so I’m happy.”

In addition to setting the Olympic record, Dressel finished with the gold medal. Australian Kyle Chalmers was close behind, finishing in 47.08, and Kliment Kolesnikov, an athlete from Russia, won the bronze in 47.44.

Dressel went into the race already having won one medal in Tokyo as part of the U.S. 4×100-meter freestyle relay team.

He had a successful Olympic debut in 2016, earning a gold medal along with a team medal in the 4×100-meter freestyle relay, in which Dressel handed off to swimming legend Michael Phelps.

But Dressel really made a name for himself in 2019, when he smashed a world record previously held by Phelps, who retired after the games in Rio, in the 100-meter butterfly.

The 24-year-old has faced many comparisons to Phelps as he emerges as a powerhouse in the swim world, although Dressel specializes in sprints — shorter, faster races.

Dressel came to Tokyo having qualified for three individual events, the 50-meter freestyle, the 100-meter freestyle and the 100-meter butterfly, in addition to relay team possibilities.

During the Olympic trials in June to secure his individual spots, he set a record for the fastest 100-meter butterfly swum on American soil.

Copyright © 2021, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.

Sunisa Lee, Jade Carey compete in gymnastics all-around in Tokyo

iStock/sportpoint

(TOKYO) — With Simone Biles withdrawing from the individual all-around, American gymnasts Sunisa Lee and Jade Carey will be picking up the mantle Thursday in an event the U.S. has won at four straight Olympics.

An event initially thought to be a showcase for the all-time great, the all-around field has been blown wide open with Biles’ withdrawal.

Each nation is only allowed up to two athletes to compete in the individual gymnastics event. After the qualifying event this past weekend, Biles, who came in first, and Lee were set to be the Americans in the final. Biles’ withdrawal opened up a spot for Carey.

Carey came in ninth in the qualifier overall — rankings that included Biles and a third Russian Olympic Committee gymnast ahead of her.

Lee, meanwhile, came in third behind Biles and Brazil’s Rebeca Andrade. The difference between Lee’s and Andrade’s scores was 0.23 points; the difference between Carey’s and Andrade’s scores was 1.13.

The Minnesota-based Lee, 18, is a phenom on uneven bars, while Carey is strong on vault. In the qualifier, they both scored over 15 points on those respective apparatuses, accounting for two of the five above-15 scores on any apparatus from any athlete in that event.

After the individual all-around, Lee has qualified to compete in the uneven bars and balance beams event finals, and Carey has qualified for the vault and floor event finals.

Americans have won gold in the women’s gymnastics all-around for the last four Olympic Games, starting with Carly Patterson in 2004, Nastia Liukin in 2008, Gabby Douglas in 2012 and Biles in 2016.

Lee is going into the all-arounds with a medal already in her pocket, having been part of the U.S. team that won silver Tuesday. Carey qualified for the Olympics as an individual, not part of the team competition.

Biles had a misstep on vault at the start of the team competition and withdrew from the rest of competition. USA Gymnastics announced her withdrawal from the all-around event on Wednesday.

“After further medical evaluation, Simone Biles has withdrawn from the final individual all-around competition at the Tokyo Olympic Games, in order to focus on her mental health,” USAG said in a statement.

The organization added that Biles “will continue to be evaluated daily to determine whether or not to participate in next week’s individual event finals.”

Copyright © 2021, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.

Packers’ Aaron Rodgers considered retirement, wants say in team decisions

Photo by Scott Clarke / ESPN Images

(GREEN BAY, Wisc.) — Green Bay Packers quarterback Aaron Rodgers considered retiring amid a tumultuous offseason, he told reporters gathered at the team’s training camp Wednesday.

In his second day back with the team, Rodgers admitted he’s still not sure what, if anything, will change about the organization with whom his relationship had grown challenging.

Still, Rodgers is beginning preparations for his 17th NFL season, all of which have come with the Packers.

“I just want to be involved in conversations that affect my ability to do my job,” Rodgers explained. That, before detailing some of the examples of veteran players the team has released or failed to re-sign at different points in his career.

Asked whether he has any assurance his guidance will be followed more closely now, Rodgers admitted he couldn’t be certain.

“I wanted to help to organization, maybe learn from some of the mistakes in the past,” he said.

Rodgers said he voiced that desire in February, even offering to help recruit players to Green Bay. That conversation, he said, changed in March, after the team declined to commit to him as their quarterback beyond the 2021 season. In response, Rodgers says, he told the team “if you want to make a change and move forward, then go ahead and do it.”

And then, in April, when ESPN’s Adam Schefter broke news that Rodgers had told some people within the organization that he did not want to return, negotiations began. He says the team initially offered more money, which was not what he was looking for.

Earlier this week, the two sides agreed to void the final year of Rodgers’ current contract, and discuss his future with the team after 2021.

The tension between player and organization increased last year, when the Packers selected quarterback Jordan Love with their first-round draft pick.

Still, Rodgers was quick to point out that he is “not a victim here.”

“I made a ton of money here, and I’ve been really fortunate to play a long time and to play here.”

“At the same time,” he said, “I’m still competitive and I still feel like I can play, I proved it last year.”

Rodgers won the third NFL MVP Award of his career in 2020.

While he didn’t rule out a return to the Packers, he also said he was not promised the ability to dictate where he would play in 2022.

Copyright © 2021, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.

Physical risk of gymnastics, Simone Biles’ skills makes mental health vital, gymnasts say

iStock/K_Lang

Simone Biles is considered one of the greatest female gymnasts of all-time, an athlete who competes on a different level, with four signature moves named after her in three different events.

The level of difficulty undertaken by the six-time Olympic medalist is one reason her decision to withdraw from both the team and individual competitions at the Tokyo Olympics is being applauded by gymnastics experts.

“Gymnastics is a sport where if you make a mistake you can get severely, severely injured,” said Valorie Kondos Field, former longtime head coach of the UCLA Women’s Gymnastics team. “The worst possible injury you can think of happening can happen in this sport if you lose your focus.”

During Tuesday’s team competition final, Biles, 24, had planned to do a vault with two-and-a-half twists. Instead, mid-air, Biles lost her way and completed only one-and-a-half twists and stumbled on her landing.

Shortly after that vault, USA Gymnastics announced Biles’ early exit from the team competition.

“I had no idea where I was in the air,” Biles said in a press conference Tuesday. “I could have hurt myself.”

Further explaining her decision, Biles added, “I just felt like it would be a little bit better to take a back seat, work on my mindfulness. I didn’t want to risk the team a medal for, kind of, my screw ups, because they’ve worked way too hard for that.”

Team USA went on to win a silver medal in the team competition, losing the gold medal to gymnasts from Russia.

On Wednesday, it was announced by USA Gymnastics that Biles would also sit out the individual competition to “focus on her mental health.”

“Simone will continue to be evaluated daily to determine whether or not to participate in next week’s individual event finals,” the sport’s national governing body said in a statement. “We wholeheartedly support Simone’s decision and applaud her bravery in prioritizing her well-being. Her courage shows, yet again, why she is a role model for so many.”

Biles had qualified in all six of the women’s gymnastics finals at the Tokyo Olympics — team, individual all-around, vault, uneven bars, balance beam and floor. She was on track to win an unprecedented six gold medals during the Games, with the aim of becoming the first woman since 1968 to win back-to-back titles in the all-around — a competition that tests individual gymnasts on each of the four apparatuses.

Dominique Dawes, a four-time Olympic medalist who competed at the 1992, 1996 and 2000 Olympic Games, applauded Biles’ decision to put herself first instead of succumbing to pressure and risking physical injury.

“[She] really got lost in the air and if that does happen there is a mental block there and the concern is not only for your mental health but physical health,” said Dawes. “And she knew if she was not going to be on her ‘A’ game, Team USA would not be on top of the podium or maybe even get on the podium.”

“What I respect most about her is she’s listening to her inner voice and she made a decision that was best for her,” she said, adding of her own experience: “During the 2000 Olympic trials I actually quit after [preliminaries]. It was too much on me emotionally; however, I was not able to make that decision. It was very much a controlled atmosphere.”

Biles’ skill level is so great that the International Gymnastics Federation (FIG) gave the double-double dismount on the balance beam, a signature move by Biles, a lower value because it was considered essentially a safety risk for other gymnasts to try.

“There is added risk in landing of double saltos for Beam dismounts (with/without twists), including a potential landing on the neck. Reinforcing, there are many examples in the Code where decisions have been made to protect the gymnasts and preserve the direction of the discipline,” the federation said in a 2019 statement. “The WTC’s task is to ensure the safety of all athletes around the world and decisions are not based purely on one gymnast.”

Another skill achieved by Biles, the Yurchenko double pike on vault, is considered so dangerous that Biles’ coach said the gymnast would have to “beg” her to execute it at the Olympics.

In May, at the 2021 U.S. Classic, Biles became the first woman to ever perform the skill in competition.

“If she really wants to do it, she’s going to have to beg me,” Laurent Landi told “On Her Turf” earlier this month. “People seem to forget that it’s a very, very dangerous skill … just to have glory and being [in] the Code of Points, it’s not enough.”

Jacoby Miles, a Washington woman who says she was paralyzed from the chest down due to a gymnastics accident at age 15, took to Instagram to applaud Biles for prioritizing her mental health.

“I experienced those mental blocks throughout my career as a gymnast, and to be quite blunt, it only took one bad time of getting lost in the air in a big flip to break my neck and leave me paralyzed,” Miles wrote. “So I’m so, so glad she decided to not continue until she’s mentally recovered. Especially at her skill difficulty.”

Jade Carey, a 21-year-old gymnast from Arizona who had the ninth-highest score in qualifications, will compete in Biles’ place in the all-around on Thursday, according to USA Gymnastics.

Biles still has the option to compete later this week in the individual finals for vault, uneven bars, balance beam and floor.

ABC News’ Rachel Katz, Morgan Winsor and Alexandra Svokos contributed to this report.
 

Copyright © 2021, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.

Baltimore Ravens star Lamar Jackson tests positive for COVID-19, will miss start of training camp

Photo by Scott Clarke / ESPN Images

(BALTIMORE) — Baltimore Ravens quarterback Lamar Jackson has tested positive for COVID-19, the team announced Wednesday, keeping him off the field for the team’s first training camp workout.

Head coach John Harbaugh says the test came back on Tuesday, and that Jackson had repeatedly tested negative in the preceding days. The NFL was working to process and evaluate the results as of Wednesday morning.

Jackson is the second Ravens player to test positive this week, after running back Gus Edwards. In Jackson’s absence, Trace McSorley and Tyler Huntley took most of the practice snaps on Day One.

The 2019 NFL MVP tested positive for COVID-19 last Thanksgiving, missing a game against the Pittsburgh Steelers because of the virus. He was activated from the COVID-19 reserve list less than two weeks later.

Jackson was one of 20 Ravens to spend time on the COVID-19 reserve list last season, including an outbreak in November and December where at least one player tested positive for ten consecutive days.

Copyright © 2021, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.

Key moments from the Olympic Games: Day 5

Wei Zheng/CHINASPORTS/VCG via Getty Images

(TOKYO) — Each day, ABC News will give you a roundup of key Olympic moments from the day’s events in Tokyo, happening 13 hours ahead of U.S. Eastern Standard Time. After a 12-month delay, the unprecedented 2020 Summer Olympics is taking place without fans or spectators and under a state of emergency due to the coronavirus pandemic.

Simone Biles withdraws from individual all-around

American gymnastics superstar Simone Biles has decided not to compete in Thursday’s final individual all-around competition at the Tokyo Olympics so that she can “focus on her mental health,” USA Gymnastics said in a statement Wednesday.

“Simone will continue to be evaluated daily to determine whether or not to participate in next week’s individual event finals,” the sport’s national governing body added. “We wholeheartedly support Simone’s decision and applaud her bravery in prioritizing her well-being. Her courage shows, yet again, why she is a role model for so many.”

Jade Carey, who had the ninth-highest score in qualifications, will compete in Biles’ place in the all-around, according to USA Gymnastics. The decision follows Biles’ early exit from the team final on Tuesday.

Katie Ledecky takes gold in first-ever women’s 1500 freestyle

Only an hour after she failed to place in the 200-meter freestyle, Team USA’s swimming star Katie Ledecky was back in the pool racing for gold and Olympic history.

Ledecky easily beat her competition, winning by more than four seconds in the 30 lap-race and becoming the first woman to win a gold medal in a 1,500-meter freestyle. Her teammate Erica Sullivan won silver.

Athletes grapple with heat and humidity as Tropical Storm Nepartak makes landfall

The suffocating heat wave in Tokyo was so unbearable during the men’s tennis singles final that Russian player Daniil Medvedev reportedly told the umpire: “I can finish the match, but I can die … If I die, are you going to be responsible?”

Temperatures in the Olympic host city were at around 88 degrees Fahrenheit, but the humidity from recent rain showers moved the heat index up to 99.

Tropical Storm Nepartak ultimately spared the Games and made landfall on Wednesday morning in Japan’s Miyagi prefecture, some 250 miles north of Tokyo.

COVID-19 cases at Tokyo Olympics rise to 174

There were 14 newly confirmed cases of COVID-19 among people at the Tokyo Olympics on Wednesday, including contractors, media members and Games-concerned personnel. The total now stands at 174, according to data released by the Tokyo 2020 organizing committee.

The surrounding city of Tokyo reported 3,177 new cases on Wednesday, a 7-day average increase of 153%, according to data released by the Tokyo metropolitan government.

After losing their first game since 2004 on Sunday to France, the U.S. men’s basketball team easily beat Iran 120-66. Players Damian Lillard and Devin Booker helped lead Team USA to victory with 21 and 16 points, respectively.

Team USA has one more game in the group round on Saturday against Czech Republic.

Serbian tennis player Novak Djokovic defeated Spain’s Alejandro Davidovich Fokina 6-3, 6-1 in the third round match of the men’s singles.

Djokovic is now three games away from achieving a Golden Slam, which is when a tennis player wins all four Grand Slam tournaments as well as a gold medal at the Summer Olympics in a single calendar year. Steffi Graf of Germany is the only player to accomplish such a feat.

For more Olympics coverage, see: https://abcnews.go.com/Sports/Olympics

Copyright © 2021, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.

Simone Biles withdraws from individual all-around competition ‘to focus on her mental health’

Fred Lee/Getty Images

(TOKYO) — Following “further medical evaluation,” American gymnastics superstar Simone Biles has withdrawn from Thursday’s final individual all-around competition at the Tokyo Olympics “to focus on her mental health,” USA Gymnastics announced.

“Simone will continue to be evaluated daily to determine whether or not to participate in next week’s individual event finals,” the sport’s national governing body said in a statement Wednesday. “We wholeheartedly support Simone’s decision and applaud her bravery in prioritizing her well-being. Her courage shows, yet again, why she is a role model for so many.”

Jade Carey, who had the ninth-highest score in qualifications, will compete in Biles’ place in the all-around on Thursday, according to USA Gymnastics.

Biles, considered the greatest gymnast in history, had qualified in all six of the women’s gymnastics finals at the Tokyo Olympics — team, individual all-around, vault, uneven bars, balance beam and floor. The 24-year-old was on track to win an unprecedented six gold medals during the Games, with the aim of becoming the first woman since 1968 to win back-to-back titles in the all-around — a competition that tests individual gymnasts on each of the four apparatuses.

The decision came on the heels of Biles’ early exit from the team final on Tuesday, after a rare stumble on her first vault. All eyes were on the reigning Olympic all-around gymnastics champion to see if she would attempt a Yurchenko double pike on vault. Instead, she bailed in the middle of her planned Amanar — a Yurchenko with 2.5 twists — and only completed a 1.5 twist, bringing down the difficulty level of her vault. She scored a 13.766, which was uncharacteristically low for her.

Afterwards, Biles spoke with her coach and a trainer before walking off the competition floor, leaving teammates Suni Lee, Jordan Chiles and Grace McCallum to finish the event. Team USA ultimately placed in second, winning a silver medal, while Russia’s team took the gold.

The United States has medaled in every women’s gymnastics team event at the Olympics since 1992.

USA Gymnastics said in a statement Tuesday that Biles withdrew “due to a medical issue.” The Ohio native, who has previously said she feels “the weight of the world on my shoulders at times,” later told reporters that she was not injured but wasn’t in the right headspace to continue.

“No injuries, thankfully, and that’s why I took a step back because I didn’t want to do something silly out there and get injured,” Biles said during a press conference following the competition Tuesday. “So I thought it was best if these girls took over and did the rest of the job, which they absolutely did.”

“Today has been really stressful,” she added.

USA Gymnastics confirmed to ABC News on Wednesday that if Biles pulls out of the remaining events, teammate MyKayla Skinner would replace her in the vault final but no other gymnast from Team USA could step in for the floor, beam or bars competitions. Only two qualifying gymnasts from each country may participate in each event final.

The 2020 Summer Olympics in Tokyo are taking place under a regional state of emergency and stringent restrictions due to rising cases of COVID-19. The Games were supposed to be held last summer but were postponed because of the pandemic. All spectators — domestic and foreign — have been banned from Olympic venues in Tokyo during the Games, in an effort to reduce the risk of infection. Meanwhile, athletes and all those in close proximity have to undergo daily testing for the virus.

Biles told reporters Tuesday that “it’s been a long year” and the Games “as a whole” have been “really stressful.”

“I think we’re just a little bit too stressed out,” she said. “But we should be out here having fun, and sometimes that’s not the case.”

Copyright © 2021, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.