Another armed home invasion robbery reported near Temple University

Philadelphia Police Department

(PHILADELHPIA) — Philadelphia police are investigating a string of armed home invasions involving Temple University students at off-campus housing.

The most recent incident occurred Monday around 6:18 a.m., when police say two men dressed in all black entered a home on the 1900 block of North 18th Street, several blocks from the university. One of the suspects wore a mask and was armed with an Uzi-style weapon, police said.

The suspects made off with several iPhones, an iPad, Apple Watches, a MacBook Pro and a Glock 19 handgun before fleeing in a black 2022 Black Mitsubishi Eclipse Cross also stolen from the property, police said. No injuries were reported and the car was recovered, police said.

Four people, including two male Temple students, were inside the home at the time, according to ABC Philadelphia station WPVI.

“They woke them up and they just had guns pointed at them,” a third roommate who wasn’t home at the time told WPVI.

“My roommates kept calm and gave them what they wanted,” he said.

The home invasion was reported nearly two weeks after two similar incidents in the area also involving Temple students at off-campus housing.

On Nov. 9 at around 4:40 a.m., three masked men in dark clothing — two of whom were armed with guns — entered a home also located on the 1900 block of North 18th Street, police said. They “approached” three 19-year-old female victims and fled the scene with a laptop, backpack, car keys and identification, police said. No one was injured.

“I hear all this rummaging upstairs in the kitchen. It sounded like multiple people, so my heart started like beating. I was shaking in bed. I didn’t know what to do,” one of the victims, Kayla Barone, told WPVI.

Barone said she tried to call to warn her two roommates, but they were asleep. She then called 911. The men locked her two roommates in one room while forcing Barone to hand over her belongings, including her cellphone, she said. They fled when they realized she had called 911, she said.

Two days later, on Nov. 11, at around 6 a.m., nine women and two men between the ages of 20 and 22 were woken up, rounded up at gunpoint and locked in a basement after two masked men dressed in black entered their apartment on the 1300 block of North 15th Street, police said.

The suspects took each victim’s cellphones, debit cards and credit cards, as well as the keys to a 2015 silver Lincoln MKZ, before fleeing in the vehicle, police said. The car and two of the cellphones were ultimately recovered, police said. No one was injured.

The victims’ credit and debit cards were used shortly after the robbery, police said Tuesday while releasing surveillance footage of the two suspects.

The victims were also Temple students, school officials confirmed.

“You never think it’s going to happen to you, but when it does, it’s like a shock,” one student told WPVI.

No arrests have been made in any of the home invasion robberies.

Investigators have not ruled out the possibility that the three incidents are connected, police said.

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Meteorologist, pilot killed in helicopter crash off North Carolina interstate: ‘Terrible loss’

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(CHARLOTTE) — A meteorologist and a helicopter pilot for CBS Charlotte affiliate WBTV are dead after their helicopter crashed near a North Carolina interstate highway, the station confirmed.

WBTV meteorologist Jason Myers and pilot Chip Tayag were killed in the crash, which occurred midday Tuesday near Interstate 77, WBTV said.

“The WBTV family is grieving a terrible loss. Our news helicopter Sky3 crashed mid-day Tuesday with two of our colleagues on board,” the station said in a statement. “Meteorologist Jason Myers and pilot Chip Tayag lost their lives. We are working to comfort their families in this difficult time. We appreciate the outpouring of support for our staff and your continued prayers for their families.”

The two victims were pronounced dead at the scene, Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police Department Chief of Police Johnny Jennings said.

Jennings called the pilot a “hero,” as the helicopter crashed just off the interstate, missing traffic and preventing additional loss of life.

“It seems the pilot that was operating the aircraft made some diversionary moves to avoid traffic,” Jennings told reporters during a press briefing Tuesday. “That pilot is a hero in my eyes.”

The National Transportation Safety Board and Federal Aviation Administration are investigating the crash of the Robinson R44 helicopter.

Myers, a North Carolina native, grew up in the Charlotte area watching WBTV, the station said.

He started his broadcast meteorology career at KRBC in Abilene, Texas, before going on to work at ABC Richmond, Virginia, affiliate WRIC.

He was most recently the chief meteorologist for ABC Lexington, Kentucky, affiliate WTVQ before returning to the Charlotte area.

“It comes with terrible sadness to hear the news of Jason Myers’ passing,” Chris Aldridge, a general manager for WTVQ, said in a statement. “Jason was a meteorologist for our WTVQ — ABC 36 News team for six years and we enjoyed every minute of our time together.”

“At this time of Thanksgiving, please wrap your prayers and thoughts around the Myers family as we remember a man gone too soon,” he said.

Myers leaves behind his wife, Jillian, and their four children.

Tayag started working for WBTV in 2017 and had been a pilot for more than 20 years, the station said.

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Bills expanding hate crime education in New York signed by Gov. Hochul

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(ALBANY, N.Y.) — New York Gov. Kathy Hochul signed two bills into law Tuesday that will expand hate crime education and training in the state, saying there is a “rising tide of hate” across the country and violence prevention is the state’s “highest priority.”

The first bill will require people convicted of hate crimes to undergo training on hate crime prevention and education as part of their sentence. The training is currently optional but not a requirement. The court or local agencies must authorize the programs, training sessions or counseling sessions.

The second bill launches a statewide campaign run by New York’s Division of Human Rights that will promote acceptance, inclusion, tolerance and understanding of the diversity of New Yorkers. In addition, public and private organizations will work to develop educational materials to be published online, on social media and on other platforms to reach the public, according to the bill.

“It’s heartbreaking to know that there are acts of violence and hatred that exist throughout our country and within our own city, in our own state,” Hochul said at a press conference Tuesday.

Last week, two men were arrested in connection with an alleged threat to attack synagogues in New York City. Hochul thanked the early warning system and law enforcement officials for their apprehension, but warned that these kinds of attacks are on the rise.

“Domestic violence extremism is the greatest threat to homeland security,” Hochul said.

“This hatred, this violence, will not be tolerated; not now, not ever,” Hochul said.

The two bills are a part of Hochul’s efforts to fight and prevent hate crimes. They are supported by $245 million in federal funding to support homeland security preparedness, counter terrorism and emergency preparedness in the state, and $96 million in state and federal funding, to safeguard nonprofit, community-based organizations at risk of hate crimes and attacks.

Hochul announced $9 million in Homeland Security grants last month for bomb squads, tactical teams, infrastructure protection, local government and cybersecurity and will redirect $10 million in state funds to support county governments. In addition, Hochul encouraged community-based organizations to apply for funding for the $50 million set aside to strengthen safety measures and protect against hate crimes.

“Why not New York? Why shouldn’t we be the place that teaches the rest of the nation, how you can do things differently?” Hochul said.

A gunman opened fire last May in a Tops supermarket store in Buffalo, New York, killing 10 Black people. A grand jury in New York returned a 25-count indictment charging the 18-year-old gunman with carrying out a “domestic act of terrorism motivated by hate.”

After the Buffalo shooting, Hochul established a domestic terrorism unit within New York’s intelligence center that focuses on social media. Hochul called on New Yorkers to take action and report warning signs when they see them.

“I’d much rather be in the business of preventing crimes and preventing acts of hatred and trying to solve them afterward,” Hochul said.

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Colorado shooting suspect purchased gun despite 2021 bomb threat arrest

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(COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo.) — The man suspected of opening fire at an LGBTQ nightclub in Colorado’s second-largest city over the weekend was previously arrested in an alleged bomb threat incident last year, ABC News has learned. But authorities said it’s unclear whether the state’s red flag law could have prevented the mass shooting.

According to a press release posted online last year by the El Paso County Sheriff’s Office, deputies responded to a report of a bomb threat on Rubicon Drive in the Lorson Ranch neighborhood of Colorado Springs, just south of the city’s airport, on the afternoon of June 18, 2021. A woman had called, saying “her son was threatening to cause harm to her with a homemade bomb, multiple weapons, and ammunition,” the sheriff’s office said. She was not at home at the time and was not sure where her son was.

Deputies were deployed to the woman’s home and realized that the suspect — identified as then-21-year-old Anderson Lee Aldrich — was actually at another residence on Pilgrimage Road, about a mile away. They contacted Aldrich by telephone and he “refused to comply with orders to surrender,” the sheriff’s office said.

A tactical support unit was called in and approximately 10 homes in the immediate surrounding area were evacuated, while an emergency notification was sent to cellphones of residents within a quarter-mile radius, according to the sheriff’s office.

A crisis negotiations unit ultimately was able to get Aldrich to comply with orders. He walked out the front door of the home and was taken into custody that evening, officials said. The regional explosives unit then cleared both residences and did not find any explosive devices, the sheriff’s office said.

Aldrich was booked into the El Paso County Jail on two counts of felony menacing and three counts of first-degree kidnapping, according to the sheriff’s office. Colorado Springs ABC affiliate KRDO reported on the incident at the time.

Aldrich, now 22, allegedly began shooting a long gun as soon as he entered Club Q in Colorado Springs late Saturday night. At least five people were killed and 17 others were wounded by the gunshots, according to the Colorado Springs Police Department.

Police said “two heroes” confronted Aldrich and fought with him, stopping him from shooting more people. Officers responded to the scene and detained Aldrich just after midnight, less than six minutes after the first 911 call came in, according to police.

Aldrich was injured in the alleged incident and remains hospitalized. As of Monday, he was being held without bond on 10 “arrest only” charges — five counts of first-degree murder and five counts of committing a bias-motivated crime causing bodily injury, according to online court records for Colorado’s El Paso County. Colorado’s Fourth Judicial District Attorney Michael Allen, who serves El Paso and Teller counties, told reporters Monday that those charges “are only preliminary” and subject to change once formal charges are filed.

The court has sealed the arrest warrant and supporting documentation connected with Aldrich’s latest arrest. According to the motion by prosecutors, if the records were “released, it could jeopardize the ongoing case investigation.”

Law enforcement officers briefed on the investigation confirmed to ABC News that Aldrich was previously arrested in an alleged bomb threat incident in June 2021, after the El Paso County Sheriff’s Office was alerted that he was in possession of a homemade bomb.

Officials briefed on the investigation told ABC News the gun Aldrich allegedly used in Saturday’s shooting was a legally purchased assault-style rifle and that his 2021 arrest may not have appeared on background checks because the case does not appear to have been adjudicated.

Homeowner from 2021 bomb threat incident speaks out

Colorado Springs resident Leslie Bowman told ABC News that she was renting a room to Aldrich’s mother, Laura Voepel, at the time of the bomb threat incident in June 2021. Bowman’s home on Pilgrimage Road was where the police standoff with Aldrich and his ultimate arrest took place, she said.

Authorities initially went to Voepel’s mother’s house on Rubicon Drive before responding to Bowman’s residence on Pilgrimage Road, according to Bowman.

“[Aldrich] apparently had an altercation with his grandparents and threatened them with a weapon,” Bowman told ABC News via telephone on Sunday. “He left their house, which was less than five minutes from my house, …and came over to my house and Laura let him in. And I know that he brought in a gun.”

Bowman said Aldrich livestreamed a “shocking” video via his mother’s Facebook account from inside Bowman’s home while authorities were outside, showing himself with a gun as well as a helmet and vest that resembled body armor. Security cameras at Bowman’s home also captured Aldrich entering the residence that day and surrendering to authorities hours later. ABC News has obtained the since-deleted Facebook Live video as well as the aforementioned footage from Bowman’s Ring doorbell camera.

“I was told at the time that there were explosives involved. But I’ve also since been told that maybe there wasn’t,” she told ABC News. “I didn’t get any follow up from the police or the DA or anyone about the case after the incident to testify or anything else. I just didn’t get any follow-ups and so I had very little information on what they did actually find.”

Voepel lived there for a total of roughly 15 months and moved out two days after the incident, according to Bowman.

Last month, on Oct. 18, deputies from the El Paso County Sheriff showed up at Bowman’s home seeking to conduct a wellness check on Voepel, according to Bowman, who said she hasn’t heard from Voepel or Aldrich since the alleged bomb threat incident last year.

After reading a local news report, Bowman said she learned that the case against Aldrich was dropped in court at some previous date and the records were sealed.

“I just thought it was really strange,” she told ABC News. “But again, I was like, well, I haven’t heard from these people in over a year, nobody was hurt and [I’m] just going to move on with my life.”

On Sunday morning, when Aldrich was identified as the suspect in the nightclub shooting, Bowman said she was “shocked and horrified.”

“It made me very upset and angry that this person who did what he did last year, obviously had violent intentions, was let go and now five people are dead,” she told ABC News. “I think there’s a lot of questions that need to be answered.”

Bowman said the only other incident involving Aldrich being aggressive toward her happened at her home one night when she returned from a long road trip and Voepel complained to her about a problem with the bathroom.

“I was like: ‘Well, you know, it’s late, I’m exhausted. I’ll have to deal with this tomorrow.’ And she and I kind of got into it a little bit,” Bowman recalled. “Andy got in my face and, because I was standing at her bedroom door, he told me to get out and slammed the door in my face.”

“I just kind of chalked it up to, you know, teenage guy, you know, trying to be aggressive and protect his mom kind of thing,” she added. “I just let it go and there weren’t really any problems with him after that. You know, just that one kind of display of aggression and everything else was fine up until the bomb threat situation.”

Motive ‘has the trappings of a hate crime,’ mayor says

Colorado Springs Mayor John Suthers told ABC News that the suspect “had considerable ammo” and “was extremely well armed” when he allegedly walked in to Club Q. While a motive remains under investigation, Suthers said “it has the trappings of a hate crime.”

“But we’re going to have to see what the investigation shows in terms of, you know, social media and things like that to make a clear determination exactly what the motive was,” the mayor said in an interview on Monday.

Club Q co-owner Nic Grzecka told ABC News that Aldrich was a stranger to their long-established venue.

“He’s never spent money on a credit card or ID ever scanned in our business that we know of,” Grzecka said in an interview on Sunday. “I think this was a community of target for him.”

Authorities decline to discuss suspect’s criminal history

Although the suspect may not have been known at the LGBTQ nightspot, which has been serving the Colorado Springs community for two decades, Aldrich was clearly known to local law enforcement. However, Colorado has very strict privacy laws when it comes to cases that were dismissed. Once dismissed, cases are sealed and authorities are prohibited from mentioning their existence, which apparently is why officials initially had not been forthcoming about Aldrich’s prior arrest.

ABC News and other news organizations have petitioned the court in Colorado to unseal the records regarding Aldrich’s 2021 arrest.

During a press conference on Sunday morning, police declined to say whether Aldrich is the same person arrested in last year’s bomb threat incident.

Colorado’s state court system announced via Twitter on Sunday that “there are no public records available under the name Anderson Lee Aldrich related to this weekend’s shooting in Colorado Springs, or any other matter in Colorado.” A spokesperson for the district attorney’s office in Colorado Springs has not responded to questions from ABC News, other than referring to the state court system’s tweet.

When given details of Aldrich’s previous arrest, El Paso County Sheriff Bill Elder told ABC News that he did not recall and had no information about the June 2021 incident.

“I have 900 employees, so, you know 550 sworn [deputies] — it’s the largest county in Colorado,” Elder said via telephone on Sunday. “I wouldn’t have any clue.”

Elder also told ABC News that he doesn’t know whether more enforcement of Colorado’s red flag law in El Paso County would have made a difference in the shooting at Club Q. The state’s red flag law, which went into effect in 2020, allows relatives, household members and law enforcement to ask a judge to order the seizure of a gun owner’s weapons if that owner is believed to be a risk to themselves or others.

“I don’t know anything specific about the shooter, so I don’t know if it would have mattered or not,” Elder said.

When asked whether Aldrich should have been allowed to possess weapons following his arrest in June 2021, the Colorado Springs mayor told ABC News that state law “prevents law enforcement at this point in time from commenting on any prior criminal activity.”

“But I think the district attorney will go to court today and we’ll be able to comment on any prior interaction with the police fairly quickly, hopefully in the next couple of days,” Suthers said in Monday’s interview.

ABC News’ Matt Gutman, Jenna Harrison, Julia Jacobo, Aaron Katersky, Jennifer Leong, Lisette Rodriguez, Kevin Shalvey, Jennifer Watts and Robert Zepeda contributed to this report.

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Idaho stabbing victim Ethan Chapin ‘lived his best life’ at college

Kaylee Goncalves/Instagram

(MOSCOW, Idaho) — University of Idaho student Ethan Chapin was “one of the most incredible people you’ll ever know,” his mother said before his memorial service.

Chapin, from Conway, Washington, was among four Idaho students stabbed to death in an off-campus house in the early hours of Nov. 13. Chapin didn’t live in the house but was sleeping over with his girlfriend, 20-year-old Xana Kernodle, who was also among the victims. No arrests have been made.

Chapin, a triplet, was born right before his sister and brother, who also attend the University of Idaho.

“We’re here to honor the life and legacy of our son and brother,” his mother, Stacy Chapin, told reporters before Monday’s memorial service, with her family standing by her side.

At Idaho, Ethan Chapin was in the Sigma Chi fraternity and was majoring in recreation, sport and tourism management, university president Scott Green said.

The 20-year-old “lived his best life” at college, his obituary said. “He loved the social life, intramurals and tolerated the academics.”

He loved sports, from golf to basketball to surfing to pickleball, his family said.

“He laughed continuously. He smiled when he woke up and was still smiling when he went to bed,” his obituary said. “He was kind to all and a friend to all.”

The murders of Ethan Chapin, Kernodle and two of Kernodle’s roommates remain a mystery.

On the night of Nov. 12, Ethan Chapin and Kernodle went to the Sigma Chi house, while the other two victims, Madison Mogen, 21, and Kaylee Goncalves, 21, went to a bar downtown, according to police. All four were home around 1:45 a.m., police said.

Two other roommates — who survived the attack and are not considered suspects — also went out that night and returned home by 1 a.m., police said.

It’s believed the four students were killed between 3 a.m. and 4 a.m. on Nov. 13, according to Moscow Mayor Art Bettge.

The two surviving roommates were in the basement and slept through the murders, police said. On the morning of Nov. 13, the roommates called friends over to their house because they thought one of the victims on the second floor had passed out and wasn’t waking up, police said.

At 11:58 a.m., a 911 call from one of the roommate’s phones requested help for an unconscious person, according to police. The 911 caller’s identity has not been released but police said “multiple people talked with the 911 dispatcher.”

Officers responded and found the four victims on the second and third floors, police said.

Authorities said they do not believe anyone at the house at the time of the 911 call was involved in the murders.

Police urge anyone with information, or anyone who saw anything suspicious on the night of Nov. 12, to call the tip line at 208-883-7180 or send an email to tipline@ci.moscow.id.us.

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Buffalo supermarket shooting suspect expected to plead guilty in court next Monday

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(BUFFALO, N.Y.) — Alleged Buffalo supermarket shooter Payton Gendron is due in an Erie County courtroom Monday morning for an appearance during which he is expected to plead guilty to state charges.

An initial hearing for Gendron’s anticipated change of plea was canceled because of the storm that dropped multiple feet of snow on parts of western New York.

Gendron is charged in a 25-count indictment with carrying out a “domestic act of terrorism motivated by hate” along with 10 counts of murder in the first degree, 10 counts of murder in the second degree as a hate crime, three counts of attempted murder as a hate crime and one count of criminal possession of a weapon.

Gendron fatally shot 10 Black people at the Topps supermarket “because of the perceived race and/or color” of the victims, the indictment said.

Gendron became the first defendant to be charged under the state’s relatively new statute domestic terrorism motivated by hate, which was adopted in 2020 by then-Gov. Andrew Cuomo. It followed the El Paso Walmart shooting that targeted Latinos. The statute is named for Josef Neumann, who was stabbed to death at a rabbi’s home during Hanukkah of 2020.

“That charge only has one sentence if the defendant is found guilty of that charge: life in prison without parole,” Erie County District Attorney John Flynn said at the time the indictment was unsealed.

The charge against Gendron reflects the white supremacist rhetoric and invective that was found on social media posts linked to him, including a belief in the racist conspiracy theory known as replacement.

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Colorado LGBTQ club shooting: Suspect held on murder, hate crime charges

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(COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo.) — The man suspected of gunning down multiple people at a LGBTQ nightclub in Colorado’s second-largest city over the weekend could face murder and hate crime charges.

The suspect — identified as Anderson Lee Aldrich, 22, of Colorado Springs — is currently being held without bond on 10 “arrest only” charges — five counts of first-degree murder and five counts of committing a bias-motivated crime causing bodily injury, according to online court records for Colorado’s El Paso County.

However, those charges “are only preliminary,” according to Colorado’s Fourth Judicial District Attorney Michael Allen, who serves El Paso and Teller counties.

“There have been reports that charges have been filed. That is not true,” Allen said at a press conference in Colorado Springs on Monday afternoon. “Any case like this, an arrest warrant will be written up that is supported by probable cause affidavit and that will be submitted to a judge for approval of the arrest of a suspect. That has occurred here in this case.”

“Any charges associated with an arrest warrant are only preliminary charges,” he added. “Very customary that final charges may be different than what’s in the arrest affidavit. Typically, there will be more charges than what is listed in the arrest affidavit. So don’t be surprised when you see a different list of charges when we finally file formal charges with the court.”

Aldrich allegedly began shooting a long gun as soon as he entered Club Q in Colorado Springs late Saturday night. At least five people were killed and 17 others were wounded by the gunshots, according to the Colorado Springs Police Department, which named the deceased victims as Daniel Aston, Kelly Loving, Ashley Paugh, Derrick Rump and Raymond Green Vance.

Police said “two heroes” — identified as Thomas James and Richard Fierro — confronted Aldrich and fought with him, stopping him from shooting more people. Officers responded to the scene and detained Aldrich just after midnight, less than six minutes after the first 911 call came in, according to police.

Aldrich was injured in the alleged incident and remains hospitalized. Once medical personnel determine he can be released to authorities, Aldrich’s first court appearance will be scheduled, which Allen said he expects to happen “in the next few days.” That appearance will be done via video link from jail, according to the district attorney.

“We will advise the suspect at that time of arrest charges and his bond status,” Allen told reporters. “He is being held without bond, so he will not have the opportunity to be bonded out.”

“Within a few days of that first appearance is when we will return to the courtroom and file formal charges with the court,” he added.

The El Paso County district court has sealed the arrest warrant and supporting documentation connected with Aldrich’s arrest. According to the motion by prosecutors, if the records were “released, it could jeopardize the ongoing case investigation.”

In June 2021, Aldrich was arrested in an alleged bomb threat incident after his mother alerted authorities that he was “threatening to cause harm to her with a homemade bomb, multiple weapons, and ammunition,” according to a press release posted online last year by the El Paso County Sheriff’s Office. While no explosives were found in his possession, Aldrich was booked into the El Paso County Jail on two counts of felony menacing and three counts of first-degree kidnapping, according to the sheriff’s office.

Aldrich’s 2021 arrest may not have appeared on background checks because the case does not appear to have been adjudicated, officials briefed on the investigation told ABC News.

ABC News and other news organizations have petitioned the court in Colorado to unseal the records regarding Aldrich’s 2021 arrest.

Colorado’s red flag law, which went into effect in 2020, allows relatives, household members and law enforcement to ask a judge to order the seizure of a gun owner’s weapons if that owner is believed to be a risk to themself or others. It’s unclear whether that law would have stopped the suspect from targeting Club Q, according to El Paso County Sheriff Bill Elder, who did not recall the circumstances surrounding Aldrich’s 2021 arrest when asked by ABC News.

Club Q has been serving the Colorado Springs community for two decades and was considered a safe haven for LGBTQ people. The nightspot hosts a weekly drag show and live DJ on Saturday nights, according to its website.

Club Q co-owner Nic Grzecka told ABC News that Aldrich was a stranger to their long-established venue.

“He’s never spent money on a credit card or ID ever scanned in our business that we know of,” Grzecka said in an interview on Sunday. “I think this was a community of target for him.”

Colorado Springs Mayor John Suthers told ABC News that the suspect “had considerable ammo” and “was extremely well armed” when he allegedly walked in to Club Q. While a motive remains under investigation, Suthers said “it has the trappings of a hate crime.”

“But we’re going to have to see what the investigation shows in terms of, you know, social media and things like that to make a clear determination exactly what the motive was,” the mayor said in an interview on Monday.

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Delphi murder case in court over whether documents should be unsealed

Indiana State Police

(DELPHI, Ind.) — A judge presiding over the Delphi, Indiana, double murder case will hear arguments Tuesday on whether the probable cause affidavit and other documents related to the suspect’s arrest should be unsealed.

Richard Allen of Delphi was arrested last month for the 2017 murders of best friends Abby Williams, 13, and Libby German, 14. The eighth graders were on a hiking trail in rural Delphi when they were killed.

At an Oct. 31 news conference announcing the arrest, Carroll County prosecutor Nicholas McLeland would not say when Allen, 50, became a suspect or if he knew Abby or Libby.

“Per the court order, we cannot talk about the evidence that’s in the probable cause [affidavit],” McLeland said.

Police also have not released how Abby and Libby were killed.

“There’s a lot of questions we have that are unanswered … but all in due time that will come,” Libby’s grandfather and guardian, Mike Patty, told ABC News after the arrest.

Allen, who was taken into custody on Oct. 26 and charged with two counts of murder, has entered a not guilty plea, according to prosecutors.

Police still ask anyone with information about the case to submit a tip at abbyandlibbytip@cacoshrf.com or 765-822-3535.

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Colorado club shooting: ‘Hero’ Army veteran who stopped suspected gunman says he feels ‘no joy’

Helen H. Richardson/MediaNews Group/The Denver Post via Getty Images

(COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo.) — A U.S. Army veteran who stopped a suspected gunman from fatally shooting more people after he allegedly killed five people at an LGBTQ nightclub in Colorado says he isn’t a hero, and he’s mourning the people who died, including his daughter’s boyfriend.

“There are five people I could not help, one of which was family to me,” Richard Fierro said during a press conference outside his home Monday night.

“I feel no joy. That guy is still alive… and my family is not,” he said, referring to his daughter’s boyfriend, Raymond Green Vance, who was among those killed in the shooting.

Five people were killed and 17 others were injured from gunshot wounds after a suspect, Anderson Lee Aldrich, 22, allegedly began shooting as soon as he walked into Club Q in Colorado Springs on Saturday night, according to police. Aldrich is facing five counts of murder and five counts of bias-motivated crime causing bodily injury, which is Colorado’s hate crime law.

Fierro and another person, Thomas James — both of whom authorities have described as heroes — confronted Aldrich and fought with him, ultimately saving more lives, police said.

Fierro told reporters that he and his family were at Club Q to watch his daughter’s junior prom date perform in the drag show that night.

He said he grabbed the suspect’s pistol from him and began “wailing” on him and beating him while telling a bystander to get the gun the suspect had been using. The suspect used a legally purchased assault-style rifle, according to officials briefed on the investigation

“I told him I was going to kill him,” Fierro said.

He asked a drag performer to kick the suspect, he said, adding that she stomped the suspect’s face with her high heel.

“I tried to finish him,” Fierro said.

According to the Colorado Springs Police Department and the mayor’s office, the suspect was beaten so severely that he remains hospitalized as of Monday night.

While Fierro may reject the hero label, others have praised his “heroic actions.”

“Richard actually was able to take a handgun from the waist of the suspect and use that to hit him and immobilize him and disable him,” Colorado Springs Mayor John Suthers told ABC News Live Prime’s Linsey Davis on Monday. “And in doing that, I am absolutely confident, and I think most people so familiar with this incident are confident that he saved numerous lives.”

Fierro said his daughter was injured in the incident and is recovering from her injuries while grieving for Vance.

Fierro was in the U.S. Army for 14 years and served in Iraq three times and Afghanistan once, Army spokesperson Sgt. Pablo Saez told ABC News.

Fierro said he left the military because he was “physically broken,” but that his Army training kicked in when the shooting began.

“I got into [a] mode and I needed to save my family,” he said. “It’s the reflex. Go to the fight. Stop the action. Stop the activity. Don’t let no one get hurt.”

Copyright © 2022, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.

How to help Colorado Springs mass shooting victims, families

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(COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo.) — Within hours of the mass shooting in Colorado Springs that left five people dead and at least 19 injured, support services have been set up for the victims, their families and the LGBTQ community at large.

Members of the Colorado Springs community have mobilized, launching fundraisers to help cover medical and funeral expenses and sharing locations of where blood can be donated.

Additionally, mental health services are being offered to anyone affected by the attack at Club Q, a nightclub that primarily serves LGBTQ patrons.

Here are some ways to support the effort and resources for those in need:

Monetary donations

Several groups have set up fundraisers, where people can donate to help cover medical and funeral costs as well as to provide help to families in the aftermath.

Club Q shared a link on its Facebook page Sunday afternoon to an official donation site run by Colorado Gives 365.

Colorado Gives 365 is run by the Colorado Healing Fund, a non-profit that sets up donations for those who are the victims of mass casualties in the state as well as their families, which was activated in the wake of the shooting.

Additionally, the crowdfunding platform GoFundMe has verified at least four fundraisers.

Blood donations

Vitalant, a nonprofit organization that collects blood donations, shared on Facebook that it sent out 70 units of blood products to hospitals in the area.

“Our hearts go out to the victims of the Club Q shooting and their loved ones,” Vitalant said in a statement. “We stand ready to provide additional blood products if requested.”

The group said donors who want to make appointments in the coming days can do so online or by calling 1-877-25-VITAL (84825).

Additionally, people can donate at blood donation centers at Children’s Hospital Colorado at the Anschutz Medical Campus in Aurora or at UC Health Garth Englund Blood Center in Fort Collins, which helps support patients in northern Colorado.

Mental health services

The city of Colorado Springs announced on its website that the Colorado Springs Police Department will be holding a Community Resource Expo on Monday, November 21; Tuesday, November 22; and Wednesday, November 23 from 8:00 a.m. MT to 7:00 p.m. MT.

“The expo will provide mental health resources, spiritual support, emotional support animals, childcare, emergency financial resources, LGBTQ+ support, meals, and other services,” the site reads.

Additionally, the city has a rolling list of providers offering therapy to those impacted by the shooting, including some offering free sessions. As of Monday morning, 102 providers were listed.

Club Q shared on Facebook that a drop-in center is being set up at the Satellite Hotel in Colorado Springs.

“GLAAD and One Colorado will be on site all week to provide counseling services or if you just need to be with family or just need a hug,” the post read.

UC Health recommends if someone is experiencing a mental health crisis, they can call 911; 988, a new nationwide number specifically for those suffering from suicidal thoughts; or The Trevor Project, a suicide prevention and mental health support group for LGBTQ youth.

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